Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is a Washington, D.C. law firm providing chemical and chemical product stakeholders unparalleled experience, judgment, and excellence in matters relating to TSCA, and other global chemical management programs.

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Margaret R. Graham

On November 14, 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the agenda and meeting materials for its December 11, 2017, Approaches for Identifying Potential Candidates for Prioritization for Existing Chemical Risk Evaluations under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) meeting.  EPA states that during this meeting, it will describe goals, guiding principles, and possible approaches for identifying potential candidate chemicals for prioritization; and take comment on possible approaches.  Under amended TSCA, EPA is required to establish processes for prioritizing and evaluating risks from existing chemicals.  The meeting materials include:

  • Agenda for Public Meeting.  The Agenda includes the following topics:  identifying potential candidates for prioritization:  background, goal, guiding principles, and milestones; overview of TSCA Work Plan methodology; TSCA Work Plan as a tool for identifying potential candidates; Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan; EPA’s Safer Chemicals Ingredients List; Functional Category Approach, based on use and exposure potential; Functional Category Approach, based on chemical structure and function; and systematic integration of traditional and new approaches.  Featured speakers are Nancy Beck, Ph.D., Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OSCPP) and Jeff Morris, Ph.D., Director of the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT). 
  • Discussion Document -- Possible Approaches and Tools for Identifying Potential Candidate Chemicals for Prioritization.  EPA states that the discussion document introduces a set of approaches that it is considering to help guide the identification of potential candidates for prioritization, and is intended to be a starting point for a dialogue with stakeholders on best practices for EPA’s activities during this phase.  EPA is asking for input on the approaches presented here, as well as any additional recommendations.

The December 11, 2017, meeting will take place from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (EST) at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, Horizon Ballroom, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., in Washington, D.C., and will be available by remote access for registered participants.  Online requests to participate must be received on or before December 5, 2017.  EPA will be accepting questions from the public in advance of the meeting, and will respond to these questions at the meeting as time allows, if such questions are received by November 20, 2017.  Questions and comments can be submitted in Docket No. EPA-HQ-OPPT-2017-0586 on www.regulations.gov with a copy to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)Registration for this meeting is available online.  In addition to hearing oral comments at the meeting, EPA is also accepting written comments and materials submitted to the docket for this meeting until January 25, 2018.


 

By Lynn L. Bergeson and Margaret R. Graham

On November 6, 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is scheduled to publish a notice in the Federal Register in which it will announce two meetings to discuss implementation activities under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) as amended by the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 20th Century Act, as well as request public comments.  The meetings are:

  • New Chemicals Review Program Implementation Meeting:  December 6, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (EST).  EPA’s first meeting will update and engage with the public on EPA’s progress in implementing changes to the New Chemicals Review Program as a result of the 2016 amendments to TSCA, and will include a discussion of EPA’s draft New Chemicals Decision-Making Framework.  EPA will describe its review process for new chemical substances under the amended statute and interested parties will have the opportunity to provide input and to ask questions.  EPA states it plans to utilize the feedback it receives from the public meeting and comments received to improve policy and processes relating to the review of new chemicals under TSCA.  EPA will be accepting questions from the public in advance of the meeting, and will respond to these questions at the meeting as time allows, if such questions are received by November 20, 2017.  Questions and comments can be submitted in Docket No. EPA-HQ-OPPT-2017-0585 on www.regulations.govRegistration for this meeting is available online.
  • Approaches for Identifying Potential Candidates for Prioritization for Existing Chemical Risk Evaluations Meeting:  December 11, 2017, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (EST).  EPA’s second meeting will focus on possible approaches for identifying potential candidate chemical substances for EPA’s prioritization process under TSCA.  As amended, TSCA required that EPA establish processes for prioritizing and evaluating risks from existing chemical substances.  EPA will describe and take comment on a number of possible approaches that could guide it in the identification of potential candidate chemical substances.  EPA will be accepting questions from the public in advance of the meeting, and will respond to these questions at the meeting as time allows, if such questions are received by November 20, 2017.  Questions and comments can be submitted in Docket No. EPA-HQ-OPPT-2017-0586 on www.regulations.govRegistration for this meeting is available online.

Online requests to participate in either meeting must be received on or before December 5, 2017.  Both meetings will be held at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, Horizon Ballroom, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., in Washington, D.C., and will be available by remote access for registered participants. EPA states that more information on the specifics of the meetings will be made available in the dockets and on EPA’s website prior to the meeting.


 

On July 18, 2016, Bloomberg BNA’s Daily Environmental Report reported on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) new chemical notice process, and included insight from industry leaders at Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.’s (B&C®) July 14, 2016, webinar, The New TSCA: Impacts on New and Existing Chemicals Programs. 

B&C Managing Partner Lynn L. Bergeson was quoted as saying that premanufacture notifications, or PMNs, that chemical manufacturers must submit before they can produce or import a new chemical, and significant new use notifications, which companies must submit before they can make or use certain chemicals in new ways, “need to be much more strategic, thoughtful and detailed.”

Both the old and newly amended TSCA state the EPA's “authority over chemical substances and mixtures should be exercised in such a manner as to not impede unduly or create unnecessary economic barriers to technological innovation,” Bergeson stated, referring to Section 2601(b)(3).  The new law makes “very consequential changes” to the new chemicals provisions of TSCA as EPA will have to balance carefully the requirements imposed by different sections of the law.

Richard A. Denison, Ph.D., Senior Scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund, stated that the changes the amended law makes to EPA's new chemicals program “are not trivial.”  Further, the changes will make it easier for the public to understand why EPA concludes that new chemicals may or may not enter commerce, what restrictions it may impose on the uses of those chemicals, and why.

BNA’s article, “Detailed New Chemical Applications Needed to Boost Market Chances: Attorneys,” is available online, through paid subscription.


 

If you are having trouble understanding basic process flows under the new Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), please reference Dr. Richard A. Denison’s flow charts that depict the basic processes applicable to existing chemicals already in commerce, and applicable to new chemicals prior to market entry.  Comparisons are shown between the processes under the old and new TSCA.  Dr. Denison is a Lead Senior Scientist at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF).  There are three flowcharts available:

  • How the Lautenberg Act Works (Existing Chemicals);
  • How the Original TSCA Worked (Existing Chemicals); and
  • TSCA vs. Lautenberg Act (New Chemicals).

You can access the flow charts in Dr. Denison’s blog post on EDF’s Health webpage:  Understanding basic process flows under the new TSCA.


 

For a deeper dive into how and when Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) programs will change and adapt to “New TSCA,” Chemical Watch and Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) are offering a series of complimentary webinars on “‘The New TSCA’ -- What You Need to Know,” featuring an impressive faculty of TSCA experts representing the perspectives of industry, environmental organizations, and U.S. Federal and State regulatory authorities.  The second one in the series, Impacts on New and Existing Chemicals Programs (Sections 4, 5 and 6), is scheduled for July 14, 2016.  The archived webcast for the first webinar, Major Changes: What to Expect and When to Expect It, is available online.  The third and fourth webinars in the series, on Information and Reporting (Sections 8 and 14), and other provisions -- PBTs, Preemption, Green/Sustainable Chemistry, will be scheduled soon.  The webinars are moderated by B&C Managing Partner Lynn L. Bergeson.